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The Link Between Obesity and Diabetes

Tens of millions of adults struggle with diabetes. If you don’t have the disease but you’re obese, you may be at an increased risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. You’re probably already aware that, left untreated, diabetes could lead to complications such as poor kidney function and an increased risk of heart attacks, stroke, and amputation of limbs as a result of poor blood flow. 

Because obese bodies tend to resist insulin, glucose could build up in your blood when it should be absorbed by your cells.

Fortunately, there is help available to make sure you’re taking proper care of yourself. The professionals at Internal Medicine & Pediatric Clinic in New Albany, Mississippi, can show you how to decrease your risk of developing diabetes and better manage your weight.

How obesity and diabetes are connected 

A common measurement of obesity is through the body mass index (BMI), which is calculated based on your height and weight. People with a BMI of 30 or higher are typically classified as obese.

When you’re obese, the increased amount of abdominal fat can affect your body’s ability to produce its own insulin. While not all obese people will develop diabetes, it’s important to eliminate as many risks as you can. 

Other factors, such as age, diet, and genetics, can affect your risks, but obesity is one of the most dangerous factors because it leads to the buildup of blood sugar. 

Changing your lifestyle can improve your health

Oral medications can help your body produce insulin more effectively, but one of the biggest preventive measures you can take is making lifestyle changes to better manage your weight.

Changing your diet to include healthier foods (including more vegetables and less junk food), regular exercise, reducing stress, and watching your cholesterol can reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life.

The staff at Internal Medicine & Pediatric Clinic discusses your medical history, and your family’s, to assess your risk factors. If diabetes is indeed in your family, the team may recommend medications and/or insulin injections in addition to making healthy lifestyle changes. 

By making lifestyle and dietary changes, you can reduce your chances of developing Type 2 diabetes by 40-60%.

Learn more about diabetes and managing obesity

You can schedule an appointment at Internal Medicine & Pediatric Clinic by calling us at 662-219-3557 or sending us a message here on our website. You can also use our website’s booking feature to request your appointment. 

Our professional, caring staff can help you learn to live healthier and prevent diabetes. We look forward to hearing from you.

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